Every nine seconds, a woman is assaulted or beaten in the U.S. In fact, domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women — more than muggings, car accidents and rapes combined.


 There is Help! ........... Help for you, your family, your neighbors, your community.

Our mission at Lincoln County Crisis Solutions is to provide support for Domestic Violence Victims and work toward the reduction and elimination of Family Violence.

If you are suffering from Emotional, Physical, or Psychological Abuse, you can call on people and services to help you Break Free from the cycle of Domestic Violence and Abuse.


Lincoln County Crisis Solutions, Domestic and Sexual Violence Services offers compassionate and comprehensive state-accredited programs for women, men, teens and children who have been affected by domestic and sexual violence and stalking.

Domestic Violence is a pattern of abusive behavior characterized by the intent to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner or other family members. The abuse can be established over time and in most cases, it begins subtly with insults, a shove or by alienating the survivor from family and friends. With time, the abusive behavior can be more frequent and severe. Domestic Violence can take many forms such as:

Physical, Sexual, Emotional and/or Verbal, Economical, Psychological.

Minimizing or blaming a person for the abuse, intimidation and/or threats or destroying property Controlling a person’s income or financial assistance, misusing one’s credit or making it difficult for a person get or maintain a job Constant criticism, threatening to hurt loved ones or harassment at school or in the workplace . Abuse can include sexual harassment, sexual assault or manipulating a person into having sex by using guilt or threats Any use of force that causes pain or injury, such as hitting, kicking or slapping.

Domestic Violence is characterized by violent actions or threats of violent actions, including behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure or wound a partner.

Domestic Violence is the most commonly used term for this kind of violence, but it is also known as intimate partner violence, family violence or battering. These definitions vary between States, Countries and Organizations, but they are all based in the same premise—the abuse of power and control in families, co-habiting or intimate relationships.

Lincoln County Crisis Solutions believes that everyone has the right to a life free of violence.

Remember, you are not alone. We can help. If you, or someone you know, is being abused, call 406-293-3223 or 1-877-493-7139


Since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) nearly 20 years ago, our Nation's response to domestic violence has greatly improved. What was too often seen as a private matter best hidden behind closed doors is now an established issue of national concern. We have changed our laws, transformed our culture, and improved support services for survivors. We have seen a significant drop in domestic violence homicides and improved training for police, prosecutors, and advocates. Yet we must do more to provide protection and justice for survivors and to prevent violence from occurring.

Although we have made substantial progress in reducing domestic violence, one in four women and one in seven men in the United States still suffer serious physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner at least once during their lifetimes. Every day, three women lose their lives in this country as a result of domestic violence. Millions of Americans live in daily, silent fear within their own homes.

Ending violence in the home is a national imperative that requires vigilance and dedication from every sector of our society. We must continue to stand alongside advocates, victim service providers, law enforcement, and our criminal justicesystem as they hold offenders accountable and provide care and support to survivors. But our efforts must extend beyond the criminal justice system to include housing and economic advocacy for survivors. We must work with young people to stop violence before it starts. We must also reach out to friends and loved ones who have suffered from domestic violence, and we must tell them they are not alone. I encourage victims, their loved ones, and concerned citizens to learn more by calling either calling Lincoln County Crisis Solutions at 406-293-3223 or 1-877-493-7139 or you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE, or by visiting www.TheHotline.org


There is one universal truth, applicable to all countries, cultures and communities: violence against women is never acceptable, never excusable, never tolerable.

Lincoln County Crisis Solutions

406-293-3223

 

Libby, MT, United States

Emergency Housing, Food, Clothing.
Assistance Completing Orders of Protection.
Weekly Support Groups.
Volunteer Opportunities.
24 Hour, 7 Day a Week Crisis Line.

There is Help! Help for You, your Family, your Neighbors and your Community

Domestic Violence & Crisis Intervention

Domestic Violence is characterized by violent actions or threats of violent actions, including behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure or wound a partner.

Domestic Violence is the most commonly used term for this kind of violence, but it is also known as intimate partner violence, family violence or battering. These definitions vary between States, Countries and Organizations, but they are all based in the same premise—the abuse of power and control in families, co-habiting or intimate relationships.

Lincoln County Crisis Solutions believes that everyone has the right to a life free of violence.

Remember, you are not alone. We can help. If you, or someone you know, is being abused, call

Since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) nearly 20 years ago, our Nation's response to domestic violence has greatly improved. What was too often seen as a private matter best hidden behind closed doors is now an established issue of national concern. We have changed our laws, transformed our culture, and improved support services for survivors. We have seen a significant drop in domestic violence homicides and improved training for police, prosecutors, and advocates. Yet we must do more to provide protection and justice for survivors and to prevent violence from occurring.

Although we have made substantial progress in reducing domestic violence, one in four women and one in seven men in the United States still suffer serious physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner at least once during their lifetimes. Every day, three women lose their lives in this country as a result of domestic violence. Millions of Americans live in daily, silent fear within their own homes.

Ending violence in the home is a national imperative that requires vigilance and dedication from every sector of our society. We must continue to stand alongside advocates, victim service providers, law enforcement, and our criminal justice system as they hold offenders accountable and provide care and support to survivors. But our efforts must extend beyond the criminal justice system to include housing and economic advocacy for survivors. We must work with young people to stop violence before it starts. We must also reach out to friends and loved ones who have suffered from domestic violence, and we must tell them they are not alone. I encourage victims, their loved ones, and concerned citizens to learn more by calling either calling Lincoln County Crisis Solutions at 406-293-3223 or 1-877-493-7139 or you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE, or by visiting www.TheHotline.org

About Us

Emergency Housing

Assistance Completing Orders of Protection

Weekly Support Groups

Volunteer Opportunities

24 Hour, 7 Day a Week Crisis Line

Because every relationship is unique, domestic violence can take many forms. The types of abuse may range from verbal attacks and controlling behaviors, to physical and sexual assaults. It is important to remember that everyone deserves to be in a safe and healthy relationship, free from violence and fear. It may be hard to recognize the early warning signs of abuse, and often the early incidents of abuse are minimized. Usually domestic violence is not a one-time incident and many find that the abuse occurs in a repeating cycle of violence. Each act of abuse may be followed by an apology, or the abusive partner may blame others for the abuse. As the relationship continues, the abuse may get worse and occur more frequently.

What can I do?

The impact of domestic violence is felt by everyone, but you can make a difference.

If you are experiencing abuse, talk to someone you trust and consider getting help to end your relationship safely.

If you are abusing your partner, take responsibility for ending the abuse by getting help for yourself.

If you know someone experiencing abuse, educate yourself to be an important source of information and support.

Take action in your community by speaking out about the fight to end domestic violence.

Facts about Juveniles and Domestic Violence


Every home is different, and so is every family. Disagreements occur in all families. However, violence or the threat of violence is not a disagreement. It is abusive behavior and it’s against the law. This is not an isolated problem. Juvenile Domestic Violence is a pattern of abusive and controlling behaviors that are used by youth against their parents, siblings, and relatives. This includes:

Physical Abuse - Hitting, slapping, punching, shoving, or using weapons and other objects to cause injury.

Intimidation / Emotional Abuse - Name calling, denial, threatening to harm self/others, abusing siblings, using threatening looks, actions or gestures.

Property Abuse - Stealing or destroying belongings, money; interfering with reporting of domestic violence, punching holes in walls.

Battering is not caused by using drugs, alcohol, mental illness, being "provoked," stress or poor anger control.

Batterers choose to be abusive!

Am I Being Abusive?

Ask Yourself These Questions:

Do you constantly check up on your partner and accuse him/her of being with

other people?

Are you extremely jealous or possessive?

Do you have an explosive temper?

Have you hit, kicked, shoved, or thrown things at your partner?

Do you constantly criticize or insult your partner?

Do you become violent when you drink or use drugs?

Have you forced your partner to have sex with you, or intimidated your

partner into being afraid to say no?

Have you threatened to hurt your partner?

Have you threatened to hurt yourself if your partner breaks up with you?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, you need to talk to

someone about your relationship. Nobody has the right to be abusive in a

relationship. There are people you can talk to about your problems:

Your parents or the parents of a close friend.

A Priest, Minister, Rabbi or Youth Group Counselor.

Teachers.

Guidance Counselors.

Local or State Domestic Violence Program, or Sexual Assault Program

Call or Email Barbara at 406-293-3223 or 1-877-493-7139

BGuthneck@yahoo.comType your paragraph here.

Need Help

Working toward the Reduction & Elimination

of Family Violence

Serving Troy , Libby and Eureka

”Domestic violence is considered one of the most pressing issues in American society. Everyone quotes the statistics given by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence: 1 in 4 women will be victims of domestic violence at some point in their lives, 1.3 million women are assaulted by their partner every year, 85% of domestic violence reported is against women. However, in a conflicting survey taken by the CDC in 2010, it was found that 40% of the victims of severe, physical domestic violence are men.